IoT Leaders
IoT Leaders

Episode · 6 months ago

Optimization & Disruption in the IoT Journey w/ Miroslaw Ryba

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

IoT has the power to disrupt and transform business processes. The only limit? Your imagination.

On a recent episode of IoT Leaders, I chatted with Miroslaw Ryba, Partner & Global IoT Leader at EY, about taking IoT to the next level.

What we talked about:

  • Business processes that can truly be transformed with IoT
  • Best practices for innovation with data
  • Elevators, vaccines, eco-friendliness, and the sugar tax
  • How data disruption transformed Royal Caribbean

If you have ideas for future episodes, input, or questions, email IoTLeaders@eseye.com or connect with Nick on LinkedIn.

This discussion with Nick Earle was taken from our show IoT Leaders. If you want to hear more episodes like this one, check us out on Apple Podcasts.

If you don’t use Apple Podcasts, you can find every episode here.

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You're listening to Iot leaders, apodcast from Si that shares real IOT stories from the field about digitaltransformation, swings and misses lessons learned and innovationstrategies that work in each episode. You'll hear our conversations with topdigitization leaders on how IAT is changing the world for the better. Letiot leaders be your guide to iotine digital transformation and innovation.Let's get into the show, welcome to the IOT leaders podcast withme, your host Nicker, the Si Ovessai, and for those of you who are new tothis podcast. This is about giving you insight information, best practices,learnings about how to deploy a successful Iot project and in eachepisode I interview one of the leaders in Iot and in this episode I'mdelighted to introduce Dr Mireslev Riba, who runs global Iot for Ey and Miro.Welcome very much and welcomed to the podcast think you for limitation gladto be here grat now. I know you've got quite some experience, so maybe justfor our listeners. Maybe you can just give me an overview of your role at Eyand how long you've been involved in Iour t yeah sure. So actually, thismiyhbe be shocking for for some people, because O lies most associated withfinancial advisor efential services, tax or transactions, but actually athy.We are working im working with IROTIEF for over twelve years and we startedtwo thousand and eight. It was long long before now this topic became Yeahi,as it is right now, and you know we're thinking first about purity security,how to secure the whole ilkcossistance how to build was kind of next step inor our thinking and we av a small team. Now we reachd the size of over twothousand people around the glow, which are ifd experts in this sense, domind,and my ole here is actually to to leat this practice and make sure that thisthree Touswil Turnto sixthousand couple of years from now, okay. Well, we needto one pack that there's a lot in there, I'm gon Ta, I'm going to start off withactually the date part of it and you're right. I mean I, and we talked aboutthis ond previous podcast- is that you said two thousand and eight and ofcouse in two thousand and eight as or listeners ill kno. It wasn't evencalled Iot. It was called MTON, machineto machine or scarder factoryfloor. We were connecting machines and then around two thousand and eleven westarted saying: Oh, it's going to be Iot and the famous prediction owe fiftybillion things connected by two thousand and twenty, and here we arejust the beginning. Ofto thousand and twenty one were eleven billion, so youknow we missed hugely and maybe we can start off there in terms of whathappened, and you know from my perspective, insingin your view and youhave a very global view. It seemed like the first wave was classic Jeoffreymore prechasm. You know innovators,...

...earlyer doptors products that were al.Isn't that cool? You know I can connect my tooth Bros, it's not being my in myLokal garage this o this yeah. I look at this. I can make it do with a button and it'slike yeah, but why do you want that? I don't know it's just cool, so you knowfor the big companies and Ey its huge multibillion dollar company and youworkt with multi billion dollar clients. Where are the true business outcomes? Imean where's the money for these clients. Is it just smart enabling products or is it muchmore fundamental to do with their business processes? It'as, I said nowit started in the garage. This whole mindsed of building Iot was firstdriven by Group of passion, people who were trying to know to change something.They sow this newapportiity on the market and you know technology wascatching up. Suddenly we realized that you know, technically speaking, you cando almost everything you know. Originally this industrial ilt or muchinto machine, as you S, said, intwo thousand eight thousand and ten watkind of a playground for trying to change something, to introduce ThoTechnology, new solutions to the existing egosystem and then was thefirst Woye. You know the first way was to put in whatever you can to your yourAccosistam, your hol, to landscape and see you know how this can improve thebusiness, how you can get additional value additional enablement thanks forthe emerging tact, it collectivity, and this was kind of tha first way, thenthe big challengs started now the whole questionmark. Okay, I have soAsomginius environment. So how am I able to ptact it how to make sure thatyou know this? Wol Environment is relival, so this basic questions ledvarious companies to what she starts. Asking questions? Okay, so what next Ican to pectically everything I can create a lot of the market, whateversortion I want. But funnamental question is okay. How am I going tomaintain it? Am I going to protect it and how am I going to eventually makemoney on this whole investment that actuliti s associated with with iltprojects ITN each others? It's insidunt e phrase that, because it's a littlebit like saying, you know that people started off with the Wat and even thehow Ge they went straight into the technologies, and I'm sure we'll talkabout that later. But but a lot of people forgot to ask the question why Imean why would it benefit me if I could connect ICAUSE? I can yeah, because Ican because it's cool look at this. You know the engineers it was driven by theengineers and starting off like Simon Sinnec. You know he says you know sortoff with the. Why H, why are you doing this? What value does it give tocustomers? So you know W H with three...

...thousand consultants working withclients. What are the business benefits if Youare in front of a sceno directorsat cxo level in a large company? What are the the business benefits in termsof business processes back in business processes, because we talk a lot aboutdigitization? What types of business processes can truly be transformed, asopposed to just doing cool things th by connecting products? That's a therysoul that now this question Wi starting cur slowly starting to emerge, and thisilt journy actuallys, changing from the level of engineers to the level of theof the C swueet and at the livel of Te Siswee. The only question is you know:How am I going to make money t it so so why am I'm going to suppose some ofthem I supposed to invest in the Viecolization, yeah and yea? Theadversation is actually today everything is digitaized, andespecially now with Thi Althe lovdowns and people not able o to work permaent indifferent locations, there's more and more inbest plants or or the need toactually make sure that we are Ju licing. All the processes whichoriginally were actually assumed that they have to be made in personalmanually on side, and now we are talking with different heavy industlicclients how to make sure that some of the work in the field nshowwork can be Donei. Multi Howto, apply emerging tack, whole lants or wint to the reality toenable the operators provvide ooperate the equipment, an machines. So there islots of the use cases, but when we're alking the decision makers,whether the usecase order the business cases and was a Valu, they can drive.It's always the the fundamental question which eventually comes up isnow: What are your main painpoints? What war is the way you want tooptimize? So this is the first Tursday measion, but there's a second dimensionof ditiization bringing Iot to the big corporations, its actually the wholeaspect of disruction, because you know you can optimize the existing thenvironment, this isin processes, but this just gives you some littleincrementaly Gri incremental benefit, yeah, exactly the key thing and the keyopportunty form various clients actually looking for this susructionand there was assinet s we did quite recently, and it shows that actay fiftypercent of FIS CS bilhit that their company did enough in terms ofestruction tobeset. So there is still huge andtough, busines ortriity todisrut Te, existing form of doing business and that's exactly what we aretrying to work. Our clants to look for...

...this area. Thattan were can disturb thecurrent business processes, the way they think about the reveue strat andthen, when we are h at the stage of finding this areas of disruption, wefinally start bringing technology. So for us, the whole topic: Furof Iottartty changed from the tectical aspects, O the business drivertechnology enable to sucs this. How we think about idetitit- and I thinkthat's a really good point- and I know you know here at Si- weve got we gottwo thousand perpure Iot play and we have twohosand customers, but it isvery, very common people to start off with saying, Hey, I want to connect adevice believe you do cunactivity Global Cunnotivto en connected devicesSi and we have to train our our business, ther, death, presales andSeles people to say well. Can you tell me about your business case and inseventy eighty percent of the time the person who's asking? I is the questiondoesn't know, and I think your point is start with the disruption. First then,look at what the business benefit could be: either COS saving or competitivenew business model innovation and then eventually land on the technology, andit's it's the opposite way round to where a lot of the, if not all, of theprojects have been so far. You know I was thinking as you were speaking it'svery analogous to the first wave of well. The Internet itself is that westarted talking about html and web browsers and cool stuff, but ultimatelythe companies that really succeeded with people hof disrupted businessmodels. I mean the obvious example Netflix today completely disrupting theAmazon, disrupting UBA, disrupting transportation, airbmv disrupting hotelbusiness. Where people just say I could actually create a brand new model, so you're operating by looking at thedesruption. So, let's assueme that we, you have a client not only instruction,but the desruption need to be followed by ha whole value created around theproduct and o know. Just just give you the example you know. Now we aretalking about the whenwhatever whanever you open to OFFTV. There's news aboutCovit. Now the whole woid is talking about Covid, an the vaccination right,but look what's happening with her. Watthe was the vaccine. U N! You haveexpacseen, but you have a product, but technically what I was thinking aboutit. You could build the whole eposystem around the product itself, where witdthis incremental cost of maybe one year an ECAS, not the current prize of thefizer is sat tund fifteen pounds, twenty us ten se Bayors Yeah Yeah. Sowhen you when it for four Modeni a bit more for for us, it neckgides, let'sthat way. Last so for one of the COMPANDS, the compedition is growing,there is more and more products. Atarenah for wone of the products isthey're very competitive. They are vaccine to th the deceate, but when youcould apply this additional layer of...

...the service around the vaccine, youcould provide the blook chain tracibrity of the the containers tomake sure that the temperature was was popobaly or roptimized the supply chainfor the deliver. exactlyethen you have a when you're vaccinated you get. Youcan check yeah, I watchingside. Now, if this vaccine, those you are getting, isthree actually the whole chain was yesan adverse reaction and workbackwards to the batch, not be abot great example. It would notbe about the vaccine, because they're all about ninety three, ninety fourpercent, it would actually be about the business, the logistics, the supplychain, the tracability in the data would determine who the winners areexactly and and the end you could go ose te further. This yououl knowexactly what Vaccinio took and said. You are assured that this vaccine wasprobably Tran, trusped son, it's fully effective, and then you can associatethis thitag with your personal id or or your social bisurance Iet, and you knowyou have the whole ecosistent build around the product and now we're nottalking about you're, not asking yourself. Okay, am I going to choosemodern or fither or Lynek, or on the other, I'm choosing the one which givesme the whole benefit where I am you know, emerged by the whole ecosystemaround the and around the back sen, and this gives the company which lashesthis additional service. You know huge combetive advantage on the market andfor me, as as a user know, I have a choice and her have additional benefit.whichlet's. Let's be honest when you're talking about the vaccine, which Iwould take IV actually so now I have to choose wich wone I want,and the price I's, not the issue here now. So there is a room to actuallyimpliant this additional ecosustem Aron around the accidenself. Yes, isinteresting. This issue. It comes back to the the question I's going to askyou, which is about the data and the power of O vast new amounts of data hatthe IOT. The connectivity part of Iot is creating turning products intoexperiences, but is creating mast, new amounts of data and that data can beused in completely different ways. I mean I was reminded there. We wereworking with a a very large Palet company e me say that who you know theysell physical products, thes son Polets, but they want to turn self into aninformation and an information. COMATY seling information through theirclients as to wher their clients. ASETS are because their appliance assets,machine parts carputs, are sitting on top of pallets to rod and Sellthem thePallet imbed the tracker inside the Palete and then tell the clients thatthe granularity is Suppli ch in data that you're referring to in that supply,Chaim part of that example. They actually have more inovention thantheir clients because they always know where the Palet is so then would sellthe information, and so the the data becomes more valuable than the physicalproduct but they've. Actually, they...

...started by saying what is the disruption that we couldply and the description would be to transform myself into an informationcompany as opposed to a a Palat company, and so I think the big companies arenow moving in to this sort of area. So let's talk about the data that vastamounts of data are now being used. What are the best practices that yousee in terms of people using dataperhaps? You have some examples of where people are using data ininnovative ways in your clients to actually optimize these supply chainsor manufacturing or warranty processes or backen proces. That you're talkingabout. As opposed to navaling product, what you get any examples you can sharewith as a of course, and actually what you said what you said this I isactually crucialt tha S ot. The Datta is driving the holocosystem and, withthe easiness of intermanting additional sensors to get a ditional data to getthe more comprehensive viewe you, the data is not the issue anymore th. Theonly issue is your imagination, how you can use thes data to build to build theusecasin services, and this was you mentione that your polotcompany is trying to be data driven data Orevelata Company, no APILITcompany? You know that's kind of more and more common botter the market,but we can still remember that at the end of the day, they are transmittingthe Palets yes, sort of physical, so the cort bates this to need to stay,and you know we had this fantastic project, super challengingfor office selevators, and when you realize the scale of this company youknow they operate, two million lifts around the globe and they every daythey provide two billion. You need to US e right, so SA tiff as piaking. Youknow, every person in the world is in the outselevators twice a week,statisticy of course, because some of them are not never in their lifetime inthe artisal elevator Soch of them reantinlike Hahas Day, but they offertwo billions uni grize per day and there's a huge huger network offurleavs. So now the question was okay: How can they leverage this? This hugepotential right? They provide. The service WIC is thelive right and theyknow everything about their Livs. They know where they are. They know whasconditions. They are so what additional extra value they can get out of it. Sowe culd for them kind of a study where we identifiaed with them or hundreddifferent heuscakes, how they can generati no value base on the data fromthe elivs and it'saet a hundred different examples of how they coulduse the data o Ye said a hundred...

...different examples. Yeahand you know, for example, one ofthee cases was at know, bas on tis reach. They had, they could shremointor. The condition of the buildings where the lifs are are ratingand this additional reveen. This could be dition Revenistrem for for thet youthey have intrastructure from the basement to the roof. So, technicallyspeaking, I think some connectivity features they couldbecome the fivg provider in the in the areas where they Wen and theyrbuildings facilities management. I we were talking to Alif Company forAmericans, friends and Elevator Company, and they were saying about China andwhether you've heard this example in China, when I was going to say preCOVID, but they're, they're pawering on so they're, probably still doing it inChina, where you have like a luxury restaurant on, say the eightieth floor.The idea of the walls of the lift become digital advertising spacesbecause it takes you two minutes or whatever to get to the top UN nhe Yourea captive market and if they know you're going to the luxury restaurant,they know that you're, a high net, TN, thenyeah and- and the idea is a almostlike- if you can identify yourself with the phone in some way they can pick upwith through your phone. You may want to get loyalty points or access checkinto the restaurant on the way up, but they know who you are now and then theycan start targeting advertising to you. So actually to your point about anelevator might be not just a means of transporting people up and down. Itmight be a way of doing facilities management in their mind. They weresaying an eleavator is actually a personalized advertising capsule, whichis going to show you the menus, but also perhaps there's a range of luxurygoods they're going to appetise. Do you no W it's this explosion of data? And I,like the phrase you said, you're only limited now by your imagination, and soI think the theme that we're both saying here is: Don't start with thetechnology. It's sort of a hard thing for Tech Company, the possble stat up with the desruptionlook at the business case. How could you enable the business case and thenyou sad nuiealize with all these senses? Actually you probably can enable thebusiness case, so it starts with a sort of an imagineering type process. Theissue of China. I move on Mer over. Can the issue of China and afcourse thereApriv different privacy, I'm sure some of will listento say are yeah, but youknow identifying yourself the ennevator in China. They let you do that becausethere's different privacy regulations and it brings the e and that's true, but the primacy of chat is changing.You know, Look Aya, look o now how Eiger we are right now to give up ourprivacy, yeah, wet tesma, O Shar companies, or you know, in somecountries you have to give out your privacy just to be able to edder to therestaurant, because, yes, your Addas Ashriweoi, we covit bevolve,...

...yeah yeah. So when you have to you willgive it up so the REK. It's tough for the regulators! Isn't it because in twoways what is the privacy of the data issue, but also I've heard some peopletalk about as we have this explosion of devices we're actually, and we talkedin a previous podcast about devices that go on parcels for tr. You tookabout the covid vaccines. You know tracking real time track and tracepallets parcels frozen food chilled food. We're creating things which arealmost like disposable devices, especially if it's on a box of frozencrab legs or whatever, and so the you know. We are actually exposing moredata and we are actually creating more things. So you know when you talk aboutChina and people say or well, you know yeah, they havedifferent privacy laws in China and people will volum will give up theirdata voluntarily. But, as you say, people are giving it a voluntarily allthe time and with Covid, that's accelerating, which raises the issue ofthe regulator and what role the regulator will play on a variety ofissues. It seems, like the regulator tap time, theyre playing catchup allthe time I mean this thing is moving so quick and yet it has to be regulated.So what is your experience in your belief as to what role the regulatormay play in the future in this explosion? BIOTA? Actually, what we seeAroni Gov, that regrators are trying to catch up an this new trands and now youchanges in the the markets and definitely derecators are seeing theneed of introducing some new ways of deading. With all the astrs of privactyor the data- and you know when, whenever we go anywhere, your data istransmitted with you, so there 's, your location is obvious. Your yourpreferences are shirt, so egraters are aware of it, and you know more and morepeople are willing nowadays to give up their pripacy for for some benefits,and you can see it all the way around and another thing is when youaretalking about the regulators, they are clearly finding the are all with thisintis buical system and one of the things we just suporte here from thefrom the whole society perspective is Eco frienziness and you meationed. Youmentioned about sessor, there's more and more devices. So there's always aquestion mar in now what to do with all thes devices which are broken or notreally use anymoreacing a problem, yeah, there's thers a huge is a future futproblem and from verittal friendiness. That's a huge playground for foor theregulator to make sure that Tonow, the ender thisthe stedent from the EVERETOperspective. They theyu use some regulations to atully. You know help orenforce this proper ways of dealing with the with the justthe waste, andyou know you, you can take a look at what's happening in different differentfront and different geographies. They...

...introducing this Sucar taxt just toforce or enable people to reduce the consumption of sugar. So there's aneconomical factor. The clinical way to force you to think am I going to buy aproduct at sugar, so I ll have a diabetes, IIL impact, thet healthcaresystem and okay, it's tasty, but it's super expressive, so maybe I'll buycheaper product with more healthier yeah right, so the SA concept could beadopted to Thain the ilt space, and you know that would be kind of anadditional factor for the companies. You Know Ami going to use the cheapratquality censor or the digital device. Woul just pass additionally, with thislic digital, it sugar, tat, yeah- or am I going to use this selfdisposing kit sessors, which aremuch wore toaa click of Frendy, but they are much more expensive in theinterm of production yeah. So I difference in the cause. The productionof the College Noyo a Frend, thes, hes or versus the regular one would bebalanced by this additional additional tax and it'll be good for for everyonefor the budgets o of counties, especially with all the stimulus thatall the world is iprenting money in Ourdas clase, do have great impact onthe on our planet and talking about printing it people listening thinginghow an earth can you have an environmentally friendly device inactonand we're probably going to make this subject of a future podcast, but we'renow seeing IOT devices being printed, I mean literally, they are you print thecircuit, you print the battery, you print the sensors and everthing eseatthe area, and then the idea is, if you can print it, can you actually make itrecyclable and can you make the other components Com possible? So it's awhole new area which we're on at the moment. So let's finish them by talkingabout some innovated case studies that we've we've eached seen here at Si, wefourteen years old as a company, we got tons O case thadies. I always try indto intruduce one one cool case study pair podcast, but let me start with you:Are there any examples of companies that you've worked with that, you thinkare, are doing it well, that ant started didn't start with the data thatstarted with the disruption, perhaps that have managed to get through theworking out how to use the data and are actually now in market, with someinnovative Iot solutions that you think are making a difference out there yeah,I'm just thinking whichcaste to choose, but now we were, the various clientswere trying to disturb or disruptive doaway of doing business. But the casewhich I believe is super powerful- and you know it can be also found on inpublic public places- is oural. Carabean were working work CARIGA for acouple of years now, and this at's Klind of e changed completely the thewhole way of of providing the service...

...so on the undecontecruise so beforebefore they topted this this Crese cruise busiess. They knew everythingabout you before in ship ship, the play a the ship, but after you board et youknow there were different probb of connectivity on the Onthe othe shipbecause it's a kin big further box. So that's always issue of the connectivity,so we working with with them. We actually distrupted all the way howthey how the USEIR journey starts. From the moment you come up with the idea. Iwill go for a cruise to the moment when you ges Bortheship, and then you, U,you have all that different neigblrment during the whole jury on theVidiueahand, then, when you, when you dis, embark, Bark Inthe Shit, so sothat was that was a great jury t at we went together with fora cravian wherewe build his use cases, and we implemented this together with them. Soso now, from the perspective, the of the Rar crabiun they are able to addoptor adjust the offer to the unique personal needs of each of thepassengers on the on the cruise and from the personal perspective of aperson who is by this cruise. You know you have all this digital sphere,dijital Acosystem, where you can act and to find yourself and choose whatservices? What features you want to? You want to get youone to buy, just tomake sure that all your cruise is isremarkable and all of which they sortof closed the loodolay, because then all of which means that after you'veexperience, you've had this fantastic experience, which is everything wasconnected and an you able o Ractis all these services. While you were thereand then, when you finish the cruise, you have this great feeling that, Ohboy, it was just such a great experience o. You then start dreamingabout your next Cruise, and so Tho IOT is actually IOT in a sensivity isalmost becoming more important than the ship, an the facilities, because yourexperience is determined by by the pevaces that are presented to you.caustomer the ship is the carrier. The Sho, tterises and connecivity isactally, the big, the olcosist yeah that products becoming experiencees,maybe I'll finish with with one of our it's not as good as world Caribbean,but it. But I think it's a very innovating case, thae one that manypeople will use every day and that's the coster express o Costoa Bo BacoCola. Previously strategy is to have coffee shots pat over the place andthey still do but but they then went into vending machines o customer of Ous,but they people might not know. There's ninety censors inside a Costa, coffeemachine. Ninety an you think of that I mean it is quite amazing, what's insidethem and what we help them working with their partner to help them design themachine and aggregate the Datapane senses and back all it into the center.But one of the things that they do is he the coffee machines are now bigdigital displays and to your point they...

...can sike. The crui ship is just h thevehicle that the coffee, the machine dispenses copy, but actually it's adigital display advertising unit. What it can do is obviously give you lots ofchoices. It's one square meter, it's not on a cost of premise I's insomebody else's premence. It's a single product scew that they roll out inevery country with global ubicodous planactivity, but one of the thingsthat now' doing is they. You can get your loyalty points by scanning the Qrcur with your fim now the point about oppiting into privacy. Is that you? You are saying? Yes, I want my loyaltypoints, but they know who you are so now you're, building up thisincredible data of everyone's coffee drinking profile on a unit of one, what they drink, where they get itwhich choices they pressd on the screen and how often they drink it and youthink of the power of that data and the ability in the future to personalizethe machine to the homeecosystem around it. Yeah yeah in services, as NATIOALFEATURES ADDITIONAL OT thirch parties to sell you stat, which is yeah the whole vending, is that thenyou could actually have relevant advertising and then, when fig comesalong, because you can do aumented reality. Think of Pokiman that this isnot custores to some other machine, other other companies, but think ofPOKEMON. Where you know you, you point your phone and you can see characterson the street. Well then, with Fivegu, you put your phone up in front of thevending machine and you get in a bill of materials, virtual bill of materialswhich shows you t a the supply chain. You know, is it fair tray, the fairtrade ingredients ar how many calories, where was it manufactured and peopleare wanting to understand that information before they buy products,so the whole area of retail? It is going to be much more about theinformation than the product itself and O. It's very, very interesting, listen.We could talk all day and I we need to finish off. I want to finishoff BA by asking you one last question: It goes back to the very first thingthat you said, which I'm still thinking about wow I mean you're running aglobal organization. You expecting it to double over a period of time, sothis is a very, very hot area. So there's lots of interesting people inthis area with doing interesting things and and that's what we try and do forthis podcast. So I is there one company or one person that you would recommendthat our listeners would benefit from if they were to appear on a future.IOTE leaders podcast, actually the biggest callenges, to say one his Yeahyeah, because because this word is full ofgreat inventors, int yescompison ideas, Andnothato, you are in Touc of all theother beeg players, sort of fom, Microsoft, yes Ri! So so I'm not goingto look for this in this direction. I'v...

...been to Payou know something wart ime.We could do each out to maybe Jeane Jan per yorall his. He can show you great war stories fromthe preject t. They did Atadition tochnologist, which tecnolig OrryMirror pasition technologies; okay, they they operate. Th wordline and thework of ICROSOLT PTC. So Hean show with you the wors stories and great casesthey they implemented either as a transition at the countes por or C Toec.So I believe that this could be the great idea to invite him to share withthe AUDIC. I will I wild. I will tell him I will tell him that even ed in aand you mentioned microsofpt and the attorney Shikee, who runs IOT globallyfor microsofty is actually going to be future guests, so that episode will berecorded shortly. So we will have the head of IOT Microsoft a on a future. Itleaders podcast, but let's, let's leave it there. It's fascinating, I think theI think start. You know being only limited by your imagination, startingup with a disruption working from that way and then getting to the technologyis the big learning it is so hard to do. Otherwise everybody would be doing it,but I think that is a really really valuable piece of advice to ourlisteners. So I just want to rap up here. Thank everybody. As always forlistening to the IOT leaders podcast, we have a large list of people who arewanting to come on the on the show and share their experiences. So thank youfor tuning in thank you to my guest Mero, who I know is recently in thelast couple of months being promoted to the werldwide level. So CongratulationsMirror and your promotion. You got a very big job with a lot of very bigclients and there's a lot of innovation going on and a lot of disruption. Sothank you for sharing some of your insights and we look forward to talkingto anl of our lissners again in the next version of the IOT leaders podcast.So thanks Maor, I think you for geting as an imitation. Thank you for for thegreat discussion. Yes great, I don't relieve it that thanks vetty much byAtiyer by thanks for tuning in to Iot leaders, a podcast brought to you by Siour team delivers innovative global Iot selular connectivity solutions thatjust work helping our customers deploy, differentiated experiences and disrupttheir markets. Learn more at SICOM. You've been listening to Iot leadersfeaturing digitization leadership on the front lines of Aiotet. Our Visionfor this podcast is to feed your guide to Iye of t and digital disruption,helping you to plot the right rate to success. We hope to day's lessons stories.Strategies and insights have changed your vision, bioteeth. Let us know howwe're doing by subscribing rating reviewing and recommending US thanksfor listening until next time.

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